How Can I Quickly Build My Credit Score?

Would you like to know the quickest way to build your credit score? The fastest way to build your credit is only to use 20 percent of your overall available credit and pay your bills on time – That is how I crew my credit. I made payments on time and consistently. Bellow, I will give you step-by-step how you can go about building your credit fast. Depending on your credit situation.

Follow these steps to build up your credit

  • Check your credit report monthly.
  • Pay bills on time
  • Pay off debt and keep balances low on credit cards and other revolving credit accounts.
  • Apply for only one new credit card at a time, and don’t close unused cards as a short-term strategy to improve your score

1: Check your credit report monthly

You should be checking your credit reportÂat least once a year. Three major credit bureaus supply the information for your account, and you can get one free from each of them once per year by visiting the annual credit report or by contacting them to ask for a free report.

A quick view of your report will tell you what’s been updated recently and whether there are any errors. If there are errors, you’ll need to dispute those with the bureau that reported them so they can be removed or corrected.

2: Pay bills on time

You can quickly build your credit score by paying your bills on time.

Avoid late payments, missed payments, and defaults. Avoid collections, bankruptcies, and judgments. Don’t let liens or tax liens get attached to your name. And don’t allow wage garnishments to occur in connection with unpaid debts.

3: Pay off debt and keep balances low

If you have credit card debt, make sure to pay it off in full every month. If you can’t pay it off in full, keep your outstanding balance as low as possible by paying more than the minimum amount due. Credit cards are not a good source of emergency funds. It’s best only to use them for emergencies, so they don’t get out of control. Paying bills on time is also essential to building or maintaining your credit score.

4: Apply for only one new credit card at a time

You can apply for a new credit card every six months, but only one at a time. However, if you are applying for multiple cards at the same time, it can have a negative effect on your score.

It’s also important to not close unused cards as a short-term strategy to improve your score. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t use all of your available credit lines; this could hurt your score because it makes it look like you aren’t using any open credit lines or spending responsibly with them. Instead, focus on ensuring each credit line has been active within the last six months before a vital loan application (such as buying a home).

5: Don’t apply for a new card for at least six months

  • Don’t apply for a new card for at least six months before a vital loan, such as a mortgage. This can cause an initial dip in your score, but that drop will be more than offset by the benefits of having more available credit than you’re using.

For example, You have one credit card with a $5,000 limit and no other accounts on your report. That’s 10% utilization; 10% is considered excellent by most lenders because you have plenty of room to borrow money without causing red flags to go off in the lender’s head (excessive debt). But if you apply for another card and get approved with a $10,000 limit—giving you 20% utilization—your score will drop because it looks like you’ve maxed out all your accounts. However, since this is only temporary (you won’t be carrying both cards simultaneously), it doesn’t mean that much over time: After six months or so, when this new account ages into its record within Experian or TransUnion (and becomes less important than other accounts), its effect on your overall utilization rate will settle back down towards 10%.

6: Open several different types of accounts

Open several different types of accounts to build a good mix of credit — for example, a credit card, a retail store account, and a car loan (you want different accounts because they show the lender you can handle various payment responsibilities).

When looking at credit cards, pick one with no annual fee and doesn’t require a yearly balance. If you can find one with rewards points or cash back bonuses, all the better.

Your credit score is a crucial component of your financial life. It can determine whether you’re granted a loan, how much interest you pay on that loan, and even whether you qualify for an apartment or cell phone plan. That’s why it’s essential to build up your credit score as soon as possible to reap the benefits of having a good one. Start by following these steps:

Conclusion

Get started on the path to a good credit score by checking your credit report, paying bills on time, paying off debt, and keeping your balances low on credit cards. You can also apply for one new card at a time, and don’t close unused cards as a short-term strategy to improve your score. Finally, opening several different accounts to build a good mix of credit—for example, a credit card, a retail store account, and a car loan. You want different versions because they show the lender you can handle various payment responsibilities)